Myotherapy and Exercise Physiology

Jacqueline Newholm is our Galen Qualified Myotherapist and Exercise Physiologist.  Jacqueline can be consulted for the treatment of dogs with postural and loading issues, damaged or injured muscle and allied soft tissue. Her treatment is primarily intended for the chronic case that could have been a result of compensatory issues from a condition, past trauma or repetitive strain.  For more information on Jacqueline, please click here.
 
What is myotherapy, and why is it beneficial for your dog?
 
Myotherapy is derived from massage and is the canine equivalent of sports massage in humans.  Massage has discernible effects on the body’s various organ systems. It helps to keep the organ tissues healthy and promotes healing so that the function and efficiency of the whole organ system is enhanced.
Because the main body systems do not work in isolation, the benefits of massage on one system will impact others as well.  For example, the muscular and skeletal systems are intrinsically paired, and therefore massage applied to certain muscle groups will have an effect on nearby joints.
 
Physiologically massage can invigorate, increase, improve, strengthen, regenerate and relax the body’s organ systems, which improves their overall function.
 
Psychologically, massage creates a general feeling of well-being, which is linked with the physical release of endorphins via the nervous system, promoting a ‘natural high’ and easing pain.  As a result, it allows the mind to ‘switch off’ and unwind, and helps to reduce the mental stress associated with being in pain.
 
A massage treatment can help your dog if you see any of the following:
- Stiffness
- Soreness
- Unable to go up / down stairs
- Unable to get in / out of car
- Mobility issues – lameness, limping
- Nervous/anxious/shy/seemingly depressed
- Posture changes
- Coat changes
- Uneven nail wear
- Twitching of skin – down their back or roached back
- Yelping when you touch certain areas of the body
- Old before their time - lost their ‘sparkle’
- Unwilling on walks
- Back / Neck / Hip issues
- Reduced performance in sports, racing, working and show dogs e.g measuring in agility or refusing to jump in flyball
- Diagnosed luxating patella
- Diagnosed cruciate ligament damage
 
Improvements that you should see after a massage treatment:
- Increased joint flexibility and range of motion
- Improved movement patterns, lameness and posture
- Reduction in pain
- Improved condition of skin and coat
- Reduced stiffness
- Improved sports performance
- Improved mood
- Increased activity
- Quicker recovery from injury
- Quicker post operative recovery
- Breaks down knots and adhesions which inhibit movement
- The dog is more emotionally and psychologically ‘lifted’ – they are enjoying life again!
- Temporary relief from chronic on-going orthopaedic conditions (i.e. hip/elbow dysplasia, arthritis) by easing the tension in over-compensating muscles.

 
 
Our Courses

Reviews

Canine Physio noticing calm, focus after training helping her exercises

Nycky Edleston

myotherapy definitely working...improvement in gait...jumping in car,on to things...done the trick

Gaby & Bertie

GSD X Beagle rescue, numerous issues, help from Ainsley, improved from day 1, I know how to help him

Sharon Ritchie

informative, huge benefits to every day life, he loves it

Carol Street

I can really recommend this course and Ainsley to everyone.

Annie

Great venue - Great Trainers - What else do you need?!

Caroline Shelford

Lots of tools and tips...huge improvement in only a couple of months...we travel 1½ hours

Mark & Gareth

I thoroughly recommend this place!

Sue Lane

Wow, lovely people, great venue and super class

Paula Topping

Highly recommended.

Rob Staves

What a great place!!

Sue Barlow

Such a lovely time

Carol Anne Street

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